Matthew McKeown
5 min readMar 26, 2021

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2020 Triumph Street Twin Review

In 1960’s America, music changed with the British invasion. But the tunes on the radio wasn’t the only invasion the British were executing, British motorcycles were selling in US markets. One of the most famous was the Triumph Bonneville. Bonnies were vastly popular, and they had the look almost everyone thinks of when someone mentions ‘Classic Brit Bikes’. Through the years Triumph has updated the Bonneville, but they always kept the bike true to its roots. Staying with the retro ‘look’, Triumph has been able to upgrade the bike with modern technology while keeping the classic vibe.

I purchased a 2020 Street Twin from Triumph’s Bonneville line recently. The first new bike, or any vehicle for that matter that I have ever owned. At the time, I wasn’t in the market for a new bike. I had just put a different engine in my 1970 Norton 750 Commando, and she was cruising by the end of the season, with minor hiccups here and there. I was informed when I bought the Norton that when my classic British bike stops leaking oil, that means it’s empty, and I have discovered that to be true for the most part. My daily rider, a 1992 Honda Shadow VT1100C, was fine, nothing mechanically wrong with it. Sure, the gas tank may have had a giant dent in it, but that discouraged people from stealing it, right? But a mechanically sound machine. When I walked into the dealership with my uncle to look at a ride he was eyeing, I had every intention of looking around, checking out the Victory he wanted my take on, letting him gab with the salesman, and going on my merry way. But when I saw the jet black Street Twin sitting in that showroom, my head turned. My Norton is great, but it needs more love before it can be ridden as a daily. What’s the next best thing to cruising my classic British motorcycle? Obviously, buying a brand-new British motorcycle! That is, if it’s a Bonneville.

The style of the bike is pure classic. The flat, easy two up seat, is comfortable and has plenty of room to move around on. Split exhaust pipes swoop down both sides of the frame…

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